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#file="c:\work\content\ProEssay4\thesis statement for the american dream in the great gatsby

#file="c:\work\content\ProEssay4\thesis statement for the american dream in the great gatsby




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What would be a good thesis statement for the Great Gatsby when writing an essay?

Some possible thesis statements below:

п»ї1. Although Jay Gatsby lived his life loving Daisy, she did not even attend his funeral.

2. Although the night life was all glitter and glamor at West Egg, when the lights went out, money could not buy Jay Gatsby happiness.

3. Although Jay Gatsby was living the American Dream, he died in an unhappy state of mind.

4. The Great Gatsby is a classic novel in which money is the center of many characters' lives; however, that money could not buy happiness.

5. All the money in the world would not make Jay Gatsby happy for he lived to love Daisy Buchanan and died without her love.

6. The Great Gatsby is filled with many characters who live hopeless, lonely lives, even though they have all the money one could want.

7. Although Jay Gatsby acquired all the money he needed, he never reached his goal in having Daisy as his own.

8. Jay Gatsby lived in a dream world and died dreaming he could have daisy Buchanan, but in reality, Daisy would never have belonged to Gatsby.

9. The Great Gatsby is a tragic tale about a man who lost his life over a woman who did not even attend his funeral.

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The above will serve you well when writing, but I think the more pertinent question is what type of prompt are you being asked to write on? Thesis statements can be very generic is the teacher or professor does not give you a clear topic on which to write. Furthermore, you run the risk of losing focus in your paper without a clear question and thesis.

Perhaps these two will help, as well as the others posted in previous responses. Just keep in mind the focus of the paper.

1. Gatsby was ultimately killed, not by a contrived, ominous chain of events, but rather, as Nick indicates, by what preyed on him: those who used, rather than appreciated, him.

2. Although Nick purports that he has reserved all judgment with regard to his summer in West Egg, however, myriad occasions reveal a deeper-seated bias against the characters in The Great Gatsby .

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What is a good thesis statement for the use of symbolism and motifs in relation to the American Dream in The Great Gatsby?I need to write an essay of how F. Scott Fitzgerald uses the devices of.

What is a good thesis statement for the use of symbolism and motifs in relation to the American Dream in The Great Gatsby?

I need to write an essay of how F. Scott Fitzgerald uses the devices of symbolism and motifs throughout the novel The Great Gatsby to connect symbols and motifs with the theme the American Dream.

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2 Answers | Add Yours

Fitzgerald connects symbolism and motif to the idea of the American Dream by using them to demonstrate what he saw as the perversion and loss of the true American Dream. Originally the American Dream was centered on the ideological: discovery of self and opportunity; individualism instead of recognition by rigid class definition; the "pursuit of happiness" as proclaimed in the Declaration of Independence. Fitzgerald uses symbols and motifs to tie decadence, decay, immorality and greed to the aspirations of Americans like Daisy, Tom, Baker and Gatsby, whom Daisy's greed has corrupted to the point of pursuing criminal activity that he might attain the things that will attract her and lure her to him.

A thesis for this might be something like: "Fitzgerald uses symbols and motifs such as The Valley of Ashes and weather to show that America had materialized its original Dream of high ideals such as individualism and happiness."

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Well. it does help to know what symbols and motifs you intend to write about in order to craft a thesis that will work, so I will suggest a couple of ideas and recommend you check out the study guide for some ideas.

Here is a sample

F. Scott Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby intentionally uses the symbols or motifs of ___________,______________ and _____________ to demonstrate man's struggle in the quest to fulfill dreams.

The Great Gatsby effectively portrays the literary technique of the symbol in many ways.

Good luck. if I knew more I could create a more accurate thesis for you.

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How to Come up With a Thesis

All students, whether in high school or college, need to write standard expository (explanatory) essays. Each essay must include a thesis statement. A thesis statement is your main point and is presented as an argument. Writing a thesis statement involves answering the main question and doing a bit or research to make sure your thesis can be backed up.

Steps Edit

Part One of Three:
Understanding Your Topic Edit

Determine the assignment or task the teacher has given. Be sure you know the type of essay, its length, format, topic, purpose, and structure. Whether you have an assigned topic or a more general topic, your first step is to distill the assignment topic into one question which your thesis statement can answer. [1]
  • Think about your assignment topic. What are you expected to write about? Then take this topic and make it a question you can answer. [2]
  • For example, if you are assigned a paper or report on explaining the safety benefits of buckling your seatbelt in the car, make it into a question you can answer.
  • Your topic becomes “What are the safety benefits of buckling your seatbelt?”
  • The answer to this question is the beginning of your thesis statement.

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Focus on the topic to be developed. A good thesis provides a concise point of view that is relevant to your subject matter. Is your topic an argument, an explanation, a personal description, a contrastive analysis, or a book analysis? [3]
  • Knowing what kind of paper you’re writing will further help you construct a quality thesis. Though you may be writing a paper about World War II or The Great Gatsby, your statement should contain similar attributes.
  • A good thesis statement answers the question asked of you. It’s your interpretation of the subject. It should aim to make a claim that others can dispute.
  • Your thesis should also express one main idea that can be developed enough to cover all parts of the assignment.

Consider what you want to say about the topic. What will your point of view be? Develop a point of view that interests you.
  • Whether you’re given a broad assignment like a paper on The Great Gatsby, or a more specific topic like the benefits of wearing seatbelts, you need to take a side and explain it clearly.
  • Break down your topic into an argument that you can adequately speak about. For example, if your topic is about the benefits of seatbelts, you have many points of view to explore. You can take a broader route and decide to talk about the decrease in fatal accidents since seatbelts became required. Or, you can get more specific and discuss the laws of wearing your seatbelt in the back seat. Your argument right now is that seatbelts save lives.
  • You can also choose to take the other side. Your argument may be that seatbelts don’t provide any new benefits. This side may be harder to argue in such a broad area, however. Because there may be a lot of information against you, you may consider getting more specific. You may consider arguing that seatbelt technology hasn’t improved safety in X amount of time. You may find that there is more information on the advancement of other vehicle safety measures which has progressed much farther than seatbelts.
  • If your topic is even broader, like a report on The Great Gatsby, you have to find an angle that you can argue about. Perhaps after reading the book, you became interested in how American consumerism and monetary pride lead to the Great Depression.

Come up with your own question to answer for this topic. A great way to come up with a solid thesis statement is to ask a question.
  • You might have the question: “What are the real world ramifications of the themes presented in The Great Gatsby?”
  • Therefore, you begin with this conclusion written as a sentence: “The monetary pride and dichotomy of old and new money depicted in The Great Gatsby lead to the Great Depression”. This isn’t your thesis statement yet. This isn’t a well enough formed argument, but it allows you to have a starting opinion and main idea.
  • Remember that you want to take a stance that reasonable people could argue. This doesn’t mean that you have to take an unpopular opinion, but you should be able to create a conversation with your thesis.

Think of how to express your point in a single, complete sentence. If you had to state your idea "in a nutshell", what would you say?
  • You have already begun to do this by finding your point of view. However, your argument isn’t fully formed yet.
  • After you come up with your idea, do a little research to see if you have enough credible information to back it up.
  • Perhaps you look up seatbelt statistics and find that there isn’t enough information to argue that seatbelt technology hasn’t improved enough. Or, that there isn’t enough information to provide a counterargument. While researching, you read about front seat seatbelts and rear seat seatbelts. You then decide your argument is that backseat passengers should be required to wear seatbelts. Seatbelts are not always required to be worn in the backseat depending on the region. You find this topic has enough information to explore.
  • Now write down a few different sentence options that argue your point of view. Try to make a slightly different point in each sentence. One sentence may be: “Backseat passengers should be required to wear seatbelts at all times.” Another could be: “Not wearing your seatbelt in the backseat increases risk of serious injury by X percent.”
  • If you are writing about a broader topic, like your book report on the Great Gatsby, you may find through research that your current argument is too hypothetical. You may not find enough factual correlation to support your topic in the context of your paper’s requirements. Further research is required to support or change your argument.

Part Two of Three:
Gathering Information and Brainstorming Edit

Compile a few sources to back up your argument. Before you waste time writing your thesis statement and then struggling to fill a paper backing up your point, gather some sources that provide you with enough information to write about.
  • If you decide to argue that seatbelts should be worn in the backseat, find sources that give you crash and safety statistics. Look for articles and facts that argue both sides of the argument.
  • If you’re writing about the themes of consumerism and pride depicted in The Great Gatsby serving as a roadmap to the Great Depression, research causes of the Great Depression. Do further research to see if other people have a similar argument to yours. See how other similar topics and articles go about relating the actual story in The Great Gatsby to the Great Depression.

Write a "scratch" sentence. Make sure it's a complete sentence with a subject and verb. It cannot be a question, or an announcement of your purpose ("In this essay, I'm going to. ").
  • With enough information to back up your thesis, it’s time to go back to what you have written already and see what you may need to change about it. Perhaps in your research gave you a new angle to include.
  • While you previously had “Backseat passengers should be required to wear seatbelts at all times,” you realize that this doesn’t fulfill all of the requirements of your thesis. Though you have a solid argument, you haven’t fully answered your question.
  • The question: “What are the benefits of buckling your seatbelt?” still needs to be addressed. Look through your research to find some specific stats to back up your statement.

Make sure your sentence beats the “So what? ” test. It cannot be solely a statement of fact, but must include evidence that backs up your opinion. If someone read your sentence, you want it to illicit a response. [4]
  • While “Backseat passengers should be required to wear seatbelts at all times,” expresses your opinion, it doesn’t provide an argument yet that someone can really contest.
  • Get specific with the “why’s” or “what’s”. “Due to X percent of unbelted backseat passengers being ejected and fatally wounded in car accidents, backseat passengers should be required to buckle up at all times.” is a more structured thesis that provides a “why”.
  • The same applies to your potential book report. “The monetary pride and dichotomy of old and new money depicted in The Great Gatsby lead to the Great Depression.” doesn’t exactly offer a specific interpretation of the literary work. Consider, “The fear of muddled class systems and the pursuit of the American Dream depicted in The Great Gatsby lead to an age of consumerism and excess, which triggered The Great Depression.” This sentence more clearly defines your stance. It also passes the “So what?” test because you have outlined a controversial point of view which presents an interpretation of the literature.

Read over your sentence one more time and see if it answers your question. Make sure your sentence includes words that state the topic, your opinion, and that it doesn’t wander.
  • Getting more specific in your thesis is good, but it can sometimes cause you to wander as you try to incorporate everything you want to say. Remember, your thesis is a one-sentence introduction that gives an outline for the body of your paper.
  • You don’t have to include every little detail you will touch on in your thesis. It should provide a well-structured overview.
  • If your original question is “What are the safety benefits of buckling your seatbelt?” read over your current thesis and see if it still answers that question. “Due to X percent of unbelted backseat passengers being ejected and fatally wounded in car accidents, backseat passengers should be required to buckle up at all times.” Your current thesis doesn’t exactly answer this question, so it’s time to revise it again.
  • “What are the real world ramifications of the themes presented in The Great Gatsby?” is answered in our current statement: “The fear of muddled class systems and the pursuit of the American Dream depicted in The Great Gatsby lead to an age of consumerism and excess, which triggered The Great Depression.” However, we can still revise and tighten our statement.

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